Behind Pollock was a good woman ?

Lee Krasner would often cut up her drawings and paintings to create collages – revising and discarding. Her exacting standards and critical eye constantly editing and reassessing. Her catalog of surviving artworks (published in 1995) lists only 599 known pieces. She was rigorously self-critical, and her critical eye is believed to have been important to Pollock’s work.

Within a creative partnership (containing two creative souls) there is always a hierarchal tipping point.

The individual who creates the most waves within the public domain automatically become the dominant figure. The perception of achievement and value automatically encircles the ‘socially successful’ individual. Within these partnerships the minor player is in many cases the glue that binds the success together. History always plays down this importance.

Krasner had a crisis of identity – being both a woman and the wife of Pollock, the public and artistic perception of her role as wife and artist lead her to sign her works with the genderless initials “L.K.” instead of her more recognizable (public) full name. The daily give-and-take of the partnership between Pollock and Krasner stimulated both artists. They both fought a battle for legitimacy and individual expression and opposed old-fashioned, conformism and its repressive culture…

…but which one drove the successful partnership?

Lee Krasner. (2012, April 7). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 07:38, April 10, 2012, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Lee_Krasner&oldid=486005656

ARTIST + S T A T E M E N T …

Notes on Painting:
  • The act of being creative is a love hate thing – The Beauty and The Beast someone fetch a priest (ref. David Bowie).
  • Action PaintingPollock. Print dribbled paint.
Peter Bright (aka This Window)
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About morgue870176

Death by Sushi' Fish can kill me. When I was very small (maybe 3 or 4 years old) my grandfather, who lost the sight of one eye from a bullet fired by a German sniper (fortunately not a very good one) during the Battle of the Somme in World War 1, wiped my face with the corner of his apron, an apron he had used to wipe his filleting knife on. He was a grocery shopkeeper who specialized in wet fish. I think I am an artist (?)

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