Archive | Influences RSS for this section

Knossos Is an inspiring place for the artist and engineer

image

Knossos – taught the Romans all they knew

Loved visiting Crete, great food, great beaches and the place where civilisation was born (maybe?)

If you put ‘art’ into a chronology, then without a doubt the skills and realistic / mythical design and output of the Cretians is far more advanced than any other civilisation that was about at the time. Their representation of the real world was fluid and not as primitive as other civilisations at the time.

Knossos Is an inspiring place for the artist and engineer.

The site was discovered in 1878 by Minos Kalokairinos. The excavations in Knossos began in AD 1900 by the English archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans (1851–1941) and his team, and they continued for 35 years. The palace was excavated and partially restored under the direction of Arthur Evans in the earliest years of the 20th century. Its size far exceeded his original expectations, as did the discovery of two ancient scripts, which he termed Linear A and Linear B, to distinguish their writing from the pictographs also present. From the layering of the palace Evans developed de novo an archaeological concept of the civilization that used it, which he called Minoan, following the pre-existing custom of labelling all objects from the location Minoan.

The palace of Knossos was undoubtedly the ceremonial and political centre of the Minoan civilization and culture. It appears as a maze of workrooms, living spaces, and storerooms close to a central square. An approximate graphic view of some aspects of Cretan life in the Bronze Age is provided by restorations of the palace’s indoor and outdoor murals, as it is also by the decorative motifs of the pottery and the insignia on the seals and sealings.

The palace was abandoned at some unknown time at the end of the Late Bronze Age, c. 1380–1100 BC. The occasion is not known for certain, but one of the many disasters that befell the palace is generally put forward. The abandoning population were probably Mycenaean Greeks, who had earlier occupied the city-state, and were using Linear B as its administrative script, as opposed to Linear A, the previous administrative script. The hill was never again a settlement or civic site, although squatters may have used it for a time.

We host on Green Servers

System Culture Limited can guide you through the conception, birth pangs and sustainability of your web presence, they can create content for your website that can help you sell your products or services, they can optimize your site for search engines and submit them to the major players. Using a combination of automated and human processes to help you towards achieving world domination.

badge-1

peter668 reblogged Do you want a test site #wordpress to 2 followers on System Culture Ltd.. Congrats!

You may want to visit their blog. Perhaps you’ll enjoy their blog as much as they enjoyed yours!

Visit Reblog

Great posts worth seeing from peter668:

Advertisements

Stolen Posts

Post below stolen from: This Window (UK) – Downloads

#Paignton – ‘Trees Dance Naked’

16 January 2013 17:08

On Sunday I went to the premier of Garry Smout’s video of ‘Trees Dance Naked’. I have a small cameo role in this Gothic (?) tale of unrequited love and murder. Not sure I will be collecting a supporting actor Oscar in the near future…

Below are some images I took of Paignton.
Paignton Beach - South DevonPaignton Beach - South DevonPaignton Beach - South DevonPaignton Pier - South DevonPaignton Beach - South DevonPaignton Beach - South Devon

Sitemaps and Seo – First in Google?: #Paignton business deals for 2013: If you have a business located in Paignton and need web services quickly we can usually update, fix or produce content for your business…

Images and photographs are memories of what was and can no longer be.

12 January 2013 11:32
'Onions' oil painting by Peter BrightThe Pentax P30, 35mm film camera  has a semi-automatic mode, which chooses most of the settings but allows for more creativity.Satin sheenRabbitsSalad Days = Maybe ?Pornography + free?powerPeter Bright - Artist
RECYCLE was an exhibition of artwork using recycled materials; anything from mud and earth to old tin cans and plastic. The theme of the exhibition was ‘Dartmoor’ – all the work related in some way to Dartmoor – using material found there or simply by artists who work there. More than a dozen artists submitted work for the show.

The exhibition opened on 15 April and continued until 27 May

The Museum of Dartmoor Life (MDL) is a local museum in Okehampton, Devon, southwest England. The museum was opened in 1981 and is housed on three floors of a 19th century mill. There is a waterwheel exhibited at the museum. The collections concentrate on the social history of Dartmoor and Okehampton from prehistoric times to the present. The museum is run as an independent charitable trust with a board of trustees.

Museum of Dartmoor Life. (2011, June 25). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 11:27, January 12, 2013, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Museum_of_Dartmoor_Life&oldid=436113896

Images with PVC packaging tape.

Devon?
2003 – 2006 – tape on found cardboard

There are several colours of tape available, ranging from brown to vivid reds and blues. These tapes are transparent and can be used in layers like watercolour paint or lithographic printing. Using tape is a very quick and physical way to create images. The plasticness of the material has a unique quality and is ideal for creating images that are bold, strong, colourful and contemporary. Each layer adds depth and intensity to the colour underneath and like lithography new colours are created as each transparent layer is added.

Photo Gallery – Naked Truth

05 January 2013 11:01
Art in Russia - Gaugauin Notebook First man in space I am a painter Domestic bliss Coat on train The first spaceman Shirts on a curtain

Sitemaps and Seo – First in Google?: Buy Art: …the next must have object you purchase will hopefully be an investment because your home isn’t… The demand for good affordable…

Bottle and Glass - Pentax Espio 120mi by 35mm_photographs

The quality of point and shoot 35mm film cameras is rather poor if you compare them to modern digital SLRs but…

The warm quality and retro feel of the images are perfect for my analogue exploits.

The Pentax Espio 120mi is point-and-shoot, mid-range, 35mm film camera (also called a compact camera) and is a still camera designed for simplicity. The Espio is an autofocus unit, having automatic exposure settings options and a built in flash unit.

The photograph above was taken using a Pentax Espio 120mi, which I obtained from a charity shop for £1.50. I used Ilford HP5 Plus a 35mm black and white film. More on HP5 here?

Design initiatives make this a small and flexible camera – notably the physical size and overall quality of finish make this camera a stylish baby. It houses a good quality zoom lens (38-120mm), with plenty of features that enable a variety of picture taking settings.

The focus and exposure system on this easy to use camera is an improvement on earlier Pentax compacts, giving sharp results and a decent contrast of tones. One of the most useful applications available on this model is ‘backlight compensation’ setting, which enables you to take a photograph using natural light in the background and flash in the foreground, giving an even tone across the image. Panorama mode is included in this little package which gives a different aspect ratio from most other cameras.

Art – slaves to the likes of Google #art

T H E L A N G U A G E OF M E . The sharing of personal information, feelings, personal details (could be fact or fiction – the majority of online persona are fake) is a strange concept. Do we like to talk about ourselves – do we think we are special? Is our online persona more interesting? Are our ‘friends’ as insecure and as dull as us? What does your boss think?

The fact that most of us have an on-line persona suggests that computer communication enables us to visit places and have discussions with people we would normally avoid. We are engaging in the pseudo-anonymous system/society. Underground activities have long since migrated out of analog media (the printed word, film etc.) into ‘this world’. This world has evolved into a global system with multiple layers in which new authorities compete to control its uses; platform wars, chip races, and operating system alliances etc. The pseudo-identity of the user is being exposed; law is punishing non-conformity, censorship and the rules of globalization have invaded the system. The Klondike Spirit has taken over the open system and turned it into the homogenized high street we all know.  The art of language and communication has been shackled.

This emphasis on words as a search engine tool has in many respect created a censorship, we can only use language in a manner that Google prescribes to gain a placement in their searches. The very nature of language has been changed an altered to accommodate this new set of rules. Closing the door on non-conformity.

Words taken out of context lose their meaning. Publishing documents that contain controversial language puts the author at risk. Any constructed environment can promote alienation, but it can also enhance communication to form a quasi-organic platform for human interaction, unless of course Google disapproves of the dialogue.

The art of language and communication has been shackled by Google.

Creating good solid business keywords is not a decorative process it is a complicated exercise. Juxtaposing words together is a bit like creating a collage, the mind always tries to create a narrative when confronted with the written word. The main problem is creating a text that not only makes sense but is also effective in attracting good search engine placement. All this weight and burden the written word carries somehow devalues the purity and the the soul of written conversation, making us slaves to the likes of Google.

(A non-homogeneous system, whose terms and relationships are not constant, allows language to break up, to stumble over the rules of its grammar, by necessity it has to respond radically to other linguistic components, creating a new linguistic order and syntax. )
PB

What is this direction? What is ART?

Clouds over Morte Point

The problems of fragmentation and confusion that exist within more traditional art practices, such as painting and sculpture (in the broadest possible milieu) are mirrored in new art practices. Within these technological and new media categories, diverse concepts and imagery has been lumped together to form a hodgepodge of non-related methodologies and artworks.

What is this direction?

Sheep Skull

The meshing together of processes, unrelated imagery and the breaking down of barriers cannot be seen as a shortcut to intellectual credibility. The dedicated thought process that goes with the creative procedure should be one of intense reasoning. It is therefore unrealistic to expect the uneducated masses to use the computers prescriptive decision making to create ‘real art’. The birth of Photoshop has enabled everybody to create ‘non-intellectual’ versions of Rauschenberg (and Warhol) – this is not ART.


I am an old dinosaur – I am very confused. What is painting? wp.me/p1GVNQ-3T Leave a comment on the page and set me on the right course

— Peter Bright (@thiswindow)

Contemporary artists have extended the boundaries of painting considerably to include;  collage, different materials such as sand, cement, straw or wood for their texture. Juxtaposing images and materials, either as a collage, printing or painting is not simply a decorative … Continue reading ?

West Buckland Festival – painting exhibited called ‘Onions’

Onions

The picture above is of my painting exhibited in ‘The Gallery’ of the West Buckland Festival

I very rarely get inspired to paint these days but I saw a painting by Renoir entitled ‘Onions’ at the Royal academy last week and decided to give it a go.

My painting ‘Onions’ is nothing like the Renior but… The skin of the red onions were iridescent like the back of a beetle, shimmering and layered in colour.

Why is most public art crap?

Puerto Calero - Lanzarote

The term public art is especially significant within the art world, amongst curators, commissioning bodies and practitioners of public art, to whom it signifies a particular working practice, often with implications of site specificity.

The need to display art in a public place is usually driven by the ego of a local authority or prominent business or public figure within in a community. Placing grandiose statements within a town or city is seen as a way of increasing the importance of a place. There is a misconception that art elevates and rejuvenates an area – this is incorrect. There is more bad public art than there is good – out of proportion statues of footballers for an example.

The public art I like is the simple three-dimensional representation of company logos – signage is great public art.

Image above – Puerto Calero – Lanzarote

I have no idea what the sculpture placed in the entrance to Puerto Calero marina is all about (I don’t really need to) I love the way it simply sits there and is being obscured by the trees.

This image was taken using a Pentax P30 SLR film camera. The film used was Fujicolor C200, a budget-priced film (expire date April 2014) processed by Jessops in Barnstaple. The negatives were scanned using an Ion Pics 2 SD.

The beauty of using 35mm film cameras and film is not knowing what you have taken a picture of straight away – the final image is a process of design, skill and chance. The chance element is the big buzz … Continue reading ?


Self Portrait of the Artist

A self portrait is a representation of an artist, drawn, painted, photographed, or sculpted by the artist. Although self-portraits have been made by artists since the earliest times, it is not until the Early Renaissance in the mid 15th century that artists can be frequently identified depicting themselves as either the main subject, or as important characters in their work… Continue reading →

I ruined the photos of breakfast on the Orient Express

As I  have previously mentioned, I haven’t used a 35mm camera for years. I took my old, trusty Pentax K1000 with me to Venice on the Orient Express and took some black and white shots of the train…. The images below are of breakfast on the Orient Express, which is served to passengers in their cabins.

I  processed the film in the darkroom at West Buckland School. I’d remembered most of the processing guidelines I’d learnt in the 1970s and I had a foolproof instruction sheet, with timings for the Ilford HP5 (400 asa) etc. – nothing could go wrong.

Half way through processing the film I noticed a chink of light coming in from below the door – the film was ruined but here are a couple more photographs that might be interesting?

The Pentax K1000 is an almost all metal, mechanically (springs, gears, levers) controlled, manual-focus SLR with manual exposure control. It was completely operable without batteries. It only needed batteries (one A76 or S76, or LR44 or SR44) for the light metering information system. This consisted of a center-the-needle exposure control system using a galvanometer needle pointer moving between vertically arranged +/– over/underexposure markers at the right side of the viewfinder to indicate the readings of the built-in full-scene averaging, cadmium sulfide (CdS) light meter versus the actual camera settings. The meter did not have a true on/off switch and the lens cap needed to be kept on the lens to prevent draining the battery when the K1000 was not in use.

Pentax K1000. (2012, May 31). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 21:26, June 8, 2012, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Pentax_K1000&oldid=495230110

Travel – 35mm images go wrong in Venice

View to St Marks Square

This gallery contains 4 photos.

I haven’t used a 35mm camera for years. I recently decided to take my old Pentax K1000 with me to Venice. I took some great black and white shots from our hotel window, looking out over the Grand Canal towards … Continue reading ?

Pentax K1000 – darkroom failure

view_st_marks_square

This gallery contains 4 photos.

I haven’t used a 35mm camera for years. I recently decided to take my old Pentax K1000 with me to Venice. I took some great black and white shots from our hotel window, looking out over the Grand Canal towards … Continue reading →

The Pentax K1000 (originally marked the Asahi Pentax K1000) is an interchangeable lens, 35 mm film, single-lens reflex (SLR) camera, manufactured by Asahi Optical Co., Ltd. from 1976 to 1997, originally in Japan. It uses a horizontal travel, rubberized silk cloth focal plane shutter with a speed range of 1/1000 second to 1 second, along with Bulb and a flash X-sync of 1/60 second. It is 91.4 millimetres tall, 143 mm wide, and 48 mm deep, and weighs 620 grams. The body was finished in black leather with chrome trim only, although early production Pentax K1000 SE bodies had brown leather with chrome trim.

English: Pentax K1000 SE, photographed by me. ...

English: Pentax K1000 SE – Public domain. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Vision after the Sermon

It's a painting of Paul Gauguin which is in Na...

It's a painting by Paul Gauguin which hangs in the National Gallery of Scotland. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This is one of those paintings I needed to see – it was an important turning point in art history. The bold use of colour was deep rooted and part of the bedrock of the Synthetist style of modern art – an extension of the pioneering vision of other artist including Emile Bernard.

Vision after the Sermon (Jacob Wrestling with the Angel) is an oil painting by French artist Paul Gauguin in 1888. It is now in the National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh. It depicts a scene from The Bible, where Jacob wrestles an angel. A vision or hallucination that the Breton women experience after a sermon in church. Painted in Pont-Aven, Brittany, France, the inherent spiritality of subjects in this painting, the influence of the cloisonnist style, all point towards a great painting and a break through in 19 century art.